GIS

Academics

Liberal arts area requirements

Overview

Guided by the principles of a liberal arts education, GIS offers a curriculum designed to enable students to reach their professional and personal goals, and to build the breadth of knowledge and creativity in thinking to help them engage with new and complex problems on a global scale. Area requirements introduce students to a variety of disciplinary perspectives, giving them the opportunity to embrace diverse ideas and philosophies, compete in multiple fields of business and industry, and determine their own path to a fulfilling future.

I. Arts and Literature

The courses offered in this area introduce students to the study and appreciation of film, photography, art and music, short fiction and the novel, poetry, drama, and
creative nonfiction. Students will learn the skills needed to analyze art and artists, authors and literary texts. Those same skills can be utilized in other areas: to evaluate the aesthetics of human environments; to explore how creativity drives business; to analyze how people interact with each other through institutions such as advertising, corporate organizations, and ideological and political systems.

II. Linguistics and Language Acquisition

This area provides a solid foundation in the study of language, the most important medium of human communication. First, the theoretical issues: how language is structured and functions in each context, and where linguistics overlaps with psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Secondly, applied linguistics and the basics of TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages). This area also examines language variation and change through interaction with other languages and cultures, including the development of English as a lingua franca in non-native settings.

III. Culture and Society

The ability to understand how social forces influence our behavior and shape our reality is critical to understanding ourselves, others, and the social world itself. Moreover, as the world continues to globalize through interconnections of capital and culture, engaging with diversity becomes not only an invitation
but an imperative. Spanning the human and social sciences, the courses in this area explore multicultural worlds, engage with problems such as racial, gender, and economic inequalities, and cultivate critical perspectives to understand the complexities of global society and the minds that inhabit it.

IV. International Relations and Governance

At the center of a global education is the aim to develop an understanding of international society, its primary actors, and interactions between those actors and regulatory mechanisms. Courses in this area introduce students to the basic organizational structures of global
politics, while also building skills students need to develop critical thinking and careers in professional fields both in a global Japan and in the world beyond it. This area covers a wide range of subjects, from theories in international relations to foreign policy analysis, studies on peace and conflict, development studies, and environmental studies.

V. Business and Economy

Principles of economics and business underly all major institutions and occupational endeavors. Understanding the economy’s components is critical for participating in today’s global environment, and knowledge of economics and business is one of the key factors in
firms achieving competitive advantage and sustainable economic growth. The courses in this area help students to develop marketing, finance, and management skills. Through case studies drawn from a variety of industries (e.g. manufacturing, technology, tourism), students will learn branding, negotiation, investment, management, and innovation.

Requirements

Students fulfill area requirements by taking at least one compulsory elective course from each area in the 100 and 200 levels. See below for a list of qualifying courses.

A list of qualifying courses

I. Arts and Literature

100 level
Readings in Drama
Introduction to Philosophy
Introduction to English Literature
Readings in World Literature
Studies in Popular Fiction
Japanese Art History

200 level
Studies in Poetry
Comparative Literature
Film Theory and Analysis
History of Photography
Art History
History of English Studies in Japan

II. Linguistics and Language Acquisition

100 level
Introduction to Linguistics
English Grammar: The Basics
TESOL I: Introduction

200 level
English Grammar Extended
The Words of English
Sociolinguistics
English as a Lingua Franca
TESOL II: Teaching Methodology
TESOL III: Syllabus and Teaching Materials

III. Culture and Society

100 level
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Psychology I
Introduction to Psychology II
Introduction to Sociology

200 level
Cultural Globalization
Cultural Studies
Race, Class and Gender I: Concepts & Issues
Social Psychology I
Social Psychology II
Crime and Society
Education and Society

IV. International Relations and Governance

100 level
Contemporary International History
Japan’s Foreign Policy
Introduction to International Relations
Introduction to Political Science
Introduction to Comparative Politics

200 level
International Security
Foreign Policy Analysis
World Politics
International Organizations
Development Studies
Public Policy
China’s Domestic Politics and Foreign Policy
Politics of Southeast Asia
Politics of Africa

V. Business and Economy

100 level
Introduction to Business
International Business and Employability
Microeconomics I
Macroeconomics I

200 level
Principles of Marketing
Foundations of Finance
Accounting
Event Management